Development of Information Technology Outsourcing Practice and its Utilisation

By:
Shaneel Shaieshkar Narayan
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Outsourcing is a contractual delegation of some information technology activity to a third party outside of the core team responsible for information technology in an organisation. This concept has been around for a number of years and there have been different forms of implementations in organisations, with increased sophistication, as this practice headed towards maturity. Currently, the outsourcing market is generating multi billion dollar revenues and organisations are reaping the benefits from it use. This paper looks at the way information technology outsourcing has developed from its humble beginning in late 1980s to becoming a proven worldwide management practice. The key strands that have appeared during the development of this discipline have been explored and gaps that exist in literature have been identified. Finally, statements about the implications outsourcing has on utilisation of information technology in organisations are made.


Keywords: Outsourcing, Management theories, Strands in literature, Implications
Stream: Technology in Community
Presentation Type: Paper Presentation in English
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Shaneel Shaieshkar Narayan

lecturer in information systems and computing, School of Computing and Information Technology, UNITEC Institute of Technology
New Zealand

I have been in the information technology industry for the last 10 years - of which the first 5 years was as a user support consultant and the rest has been teaching. My personal area of interest in networks and secutiy in which I will be starting a Doctor of Computing shortly. Currently I hold the following qualifications - BE, PGDipBus, MCSE, CCNA.

My research outputs to date:
Research Outputs

• Narayan, S. & Joyce, D. (2001). An Investigation into Intensive Mode Course Delivery. Presented to the 14th Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications, 2-5 July, Napier.
• Joyce, D. & Narayan S. (2001). Choosing Between BBS and BCS. Presented to the 14th Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications, 2-5 July, Napier.
• Narayan, S. (2002). MCSE, To Be or Not To Be -An Investigation into Vendor Certification. Presented to the Annual South Pacific User Support Conference, 26-29 November, Hamilton.
• Narayan, S. (2003). Copy-right or Copy-wrong –Software Licensing. Presented to the 16th Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications, 6-9 July, Palmerton North.
• Narayan, S. & Narayan, S. (2004). Developing a Framework for an Information Security Paper. Concise paper presented to the 17th Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications, 6-9 July, Christchurch.
• Narayan, S. (2004). Attitudes and Activities of Students towards Internet and Information Security. Presented to the 17th Annual Conference of the National Advisory Committee on Computing Qualifications, 6-9 July, Christchurch.
• Narayan, S. & Narayan, S. (2004, November). Information Security Qualifications in New Zealand. Bulletin of Applied Computing and Information Technology Vol. 2, Issue 3. ISSN 1176-4120.

Ref: T06P0094